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Keller ISD Garage Sale to Raise Funds for Charity | Timber Creek Talon

April 13th, 2015

The Interact Clubs of Keller, Central and Timber Creek high schools will be holding Keller ISD’s first annual garage sale on Saturday, April 11.The event will be held at Timber Creek High School from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the student/teacher parking lots positioned behind the school. In addition to garage sale items there will also be a bake sale.The profits will be donated to Sower of Seeds International.

The Sower of Seeds organization is an international organization dedicated to “responding to cries of help.” They build clean water centers in India, and work on community development in India. One of their bigger programs is Project Red Light Rescue; a program rescues the victims of human trafficking. After rescue the girls are rehabilitated into havens where they are educated, and taught a trade so they can work and begin to provide for themselves.Clubs have been invited to set up booths to sell donated items. Clubs that have booths in the garage sale will donate 50 percent of profits to the Sower of Seeds organization. The Interact clubs are donating 100 percent.To find out more about the Sower of Seeds organization visit www.sowerofseeds.org

via Keller ISD Garage Sale to Raise Funds for Charity | Timber Creek Talon.

Rains or Not, India Is Falling Short on Drinkable Water – NYTimes.com

March 30th, 2015

That people in one of the rainiest places on the planet struggle to get potable water is emblematic of the profound water challenges that India faces. Every year, about 600,000 Indian children die because of diarrhea or pneumonia, often caused by toxic water and poor hygiene, according to Unicef.

Half of the water supply in rural areas, where 70 percent of India’s population lives, is routinely contaminated with toxic bacteria. Employment in manufacturing in India has declined in recent years, and a prime reason may be the difficulty companies face getting water.

via Rains or Not, India Is Falling Short on Drinkable Water – NYTimes.com.

Photo of the Week: What We Have In Common.

March 30th, 2015

Each child matters, whether they are hidden in communities most people avoid or silenced before their time by simple illnesses the rest of the world can prevent. Water is at the center of hygiene and its importance is underestimated by all but those who do not know how to keep their children clean and healthy.

Providing a cup of water to a child in need is a gesture that transcends culture, language and religion.

Slum

© Sower of Seeds International Ministries 2015 –  All rights reserved.  All written material and photographs belong exclusively to Sower of Seeds International Ministries unless where otherwise noted. To request permission to re-post or use any material found on this website please contact us.

Villagers dig hours to fill a pot of water – The Times of India

March 23rd, 2015

BEED/JALNA: In the pitch darkness at 3am, the village of Katchincholi empties out onto the bone-dry river bed of the Godavari. Armed with as many pots as they can carry, the women start digging the gravel with their hands. Once a muddy pool of water appears, they scoop it into their pots. Then they strain the sludge and stones. This is the water the village drinks.A single pot takes up to two hours to fill. And each home needs at least three pots of water daily. “I am here for at least six hours every day. My wrist-bones have started jutting out,” says Gangubai Shinde, who is in her 60s. As hundreds queue up at the water-holes, bitter fights break out.READ ALSO: 40% rise in farmer suicides in MaharashtraKatchincholi’s residents cannot bathe more than once a week. “We wipe ourselves with a wet cloth. We wipe our plates and hands after a meal instead of washing them,” says former sarpanch Limbaji Khote. None of the toilets in the village can be used for lack of water.

via In arid Marathwada, villagers dig hours to fill a pot of water – The Times of India.

Photo of the Week: The Worst Form of Violence

March 23rd, 2015

“Poverty is the worst form of violence.” – Mahatma Gandhi 

A Young boy walking barefoot steps over sewage running down a walkway in a Mumbai slum. Living conditions in slums are appalling. Improper sanitation, lack of access to clean water and other basic needs, places children growing up in slums at a severe disadvantage.

“Children’s health is primarily determined by the socioeconomic conditions in which they are born, grow and live, and these are in turn shaped by the distribution of power and resources. The consequences of having too little of both are most readily evident in informal settlements and slums, where roughly 1.4 billion people will live by 2020” – UNICEF

Child

© Sower of Seeds International Ministries 2015 –  All rights reserved.  All written material and photographs belong exclusively to Sower of Seeds International Ministries unless where otherwise noted. To request permission to re-post or use any material found on this website please contact us.

Photo of the Week: Hope

March 16th, 2015

“Because of the water problems they are not able to work nor send their children to school.” – SOS outreach partner 

Not having proper access to clean water effects every aspect of life. In Mumbai’s slums this is especially evident. Children often bear the burden of collecting water, preventing them from attending school. Without education children become essentially trapped in the cycle they were born into, with little hope of achieving a better life than that of their parents. By providing a water well in a community you are providing essential relief, but also hope for the next generation. The photograph below show children who have grown up in a slum where SOS has helped to provide water wells and daily meals in a number of pre-schools for almost 10 years. Because of these outreaches, children in this community have been able to excel in public school and pursue dreams their parents never thought possible.

“For I know the plans I have for you,” says the Lord. “They are plans for good and not for disaster, to give you a future and a hope.” – Jeremiah 29:11

School Children

© Sower of Seeds International Ministries 2015 –  All rights reserved.  All written material and photographs belong exclusively to Sower of Seeds International Ministries unless where otherwise noted. To request permission to re-post or use any material found on this website please contact us.

For nearly a billion people, a glass of water means miles to walk – CNN.com

March 12th, 2015

Nearly a billion people worldwide have limited access to clean water, the State Department says, and the crisis disproportionately affects women and girls.”On average, women in developing countries walk 6 kilometers a day to collect water” because there is not enough of it nearby, Undersecretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs Maria Otero told CNN.

via For nearly a billion people, a glass of water means miles to walk – CNN.com.

Photo of the Week: A Hero

March 9th, 2015

“Anyone who does anything to help a child in his life is a hero to me.” – Fred Rogers 

Young girls helping to fill water buckets is a common sight in Mumbai’s slums. When basic daily needs like clean water are met, children flourish. A water well in a community means children can play and grow without the worries and tasks of life weighing on them.

Girl

© Sower of Seeds International Ministries 2015 –  All rights reserved.  All written material and photographs belong exclusively to Sower of Seeds International Ministries unless where otherwise noted. To request permission to re-post or use any material found on this website please contact us.

Here is your mother

March 8th, 2015

Guest blog by Jackie Skellie

Every year, March 8 the international community promotes the celebration of International Women’s Day.

Women’s issues like sexual exploitation are increasingly being recognized as universal issues with far-reaching consequences for men and women alike. Our sons and daughters are equally at risk when our society neglects the expression of God’s image in us, whether male or female.

According to the official website of International Women’s Day, March 8th has been a day to celebrate women since 1908.

People all over the world recognize this day to celebrate their mothers, sisters, wives, teachers, and friends and to highlight the unique strengths and gifts that women bring to their lives. It is even considered an official holiday in many countries including Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, Cuba, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Madagascar, Moldova, Mongolia, Nepal, Russia, Tajikistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Vietnam and Zambia.

Women form an essential part of our communities, our families, our churches, our education systems, and our everyday lives.

Rachel Held Evans, in her book A Year of Biblical Womanhood, came to this realization:
“Among the women praised in Scripture are warriors, widows, slaves, sister wives, apostles, teachers, concubines, queens, foreigners, prostitutes, prophets, mothers, and martyrs. What makes these women’s stories leap from the page is not the fact that they all conform to some kind of universal ideal, but that, regardless of the culture or context in which they found themselves, they lived their lives with valor and faith.”

It might not be apparent to us, but we can and should learn to recognize the valor and faith of the women in our lives today: Whether it be one of the over 9 million single moms in the United States, the women throughout the developing world who have to walk miles every day to get water for their families, or the women who are trapped in sex slavery among the 27 million slaves in the world today, it should our goal as believers to honor and equip women with the encouragement and tools they need to continue making a daily difference in our society.

There is a movement breaking out today that celebrates women freely—that understands the very different way that each and every person is wired and that respects and celebrates those differences. I believe that this movement is one close to the heart of God. I believe that God has just as much love, calling, and destiny for the lives of women as He does for the lives of men. In fact, Paul writes, “There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). In John 19: 25-27, we see Jesus urging John to care for His mother, Mary, in these words, “Here is your mother.”

God is divinely creative; He has crafted us to express every facet of His being.

Each person reflects Him in a different way that could not be reflected by anyone else. God does not waste anything (John 6:12)! I find it hard to believe that He would place individual and unique gifts into the hearts of His people without the intention of letting those gifts blossom for the glory of His Kingdom.

It is important that we recognize the gifts God personifies in our mothers, sisters and daughters. We can see Him in the way a mother fiercely protects her children, in her daily valor to nurture and her compassion toward the poor, the wounded and the lost.

Women are distinctly different than men, and they have an equally important role to play in God’s master plan for mankind. For He looked at Adam, the very crown of His creation, the most intricate and complex being He made in His very own image, and He decided to add one missing thing: woman.

Stasi Eldredge, acclaimed bestselling author, puts it this way:
“Women have been essential to every great move of God. Yes, Moses led the Israelites out of Egypt, but only after his mother risked her life to save him! Closer to our time, Clara Barton was instrumental in starting the Red Cross. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin put fire into people’s heart to end slavery in the United States. Rosa Parks kicked the Civil Rights movement into gear with her quiet act of courage. Eunice Kennedy Shriver created the Special Olympics. Mother Teresa inspired the world by bringing love to countless thought unlovable. And millions of other women quietly change the world every day by bringing the love of God to those around them.”

Let us remember, not only on days like women’s day and mother’s day, that God so loved and valued the world, populated by his children (sons and daughters), that He gave Jesus so we may (all) be reconciled to Him.

 

Leading a Push for Clean Water – NYTimes.com

March 3rd, 2015

Water shortages are endemic in India in the hot months and can turn into far more lethal droughts. But that the protesters were mostly women was a reflection of the fact that, in India and in some other parts of the world, like sub-Saharan Africa, water collection and management is women’s work.As the heat and dust sweep over the plains of the Subcontinent, dragging large swaths of the country into the long dry months of summer, women bear the brunt of water management. But they are also crucial to any significant improvements in the water supply.

via Leading a Push for Clean Water – NYTimes.com.

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